Five Reason to Participate in the Annual Resident Survey

Bentson_Copple_Annual_Orthodontic_Resident_SurveyBy: Laura Overcash
Director of Marketing

Over the last eight years, our company has conducted a nationwide survey of orthodontic residents to collect, compile, and analyze useful data about orthodontics in the United States. We are currently collecting responses from orthodontic residents and we encourage you to click on this link and participate in this vital survey.

It may sound like just another survey but it’s more than just a data collection tool – the Annual Orthodontic Resident Survey is a critical tool to understanding and predicting future trends in the industry. Still not convinced the survey is worth your time? Here are five reasons to participate.

Offer Insights
Unfortunately, we can’t read minds, so we need help in understanding today’s resident journey. The survey’s primary objective is to provide its participants and those within the orthodontic industry with relevant, accurate, and useful data. The variety of questions asked helps gauge residents’ plans and how it will affect the overall orthodontic industry. We believe that understanding resident sentiment is important since this group of young doctors and the decisions they make will have a great impact on the profession going forward.

Minimal Time Commitment 
Feedback Habits Survey reports that 45% of survey respondents aren’t willing to spend more than five minutes completing a survey. You are in luck with our Resident Survey – our team understands the time constraints you have while enrolled in your program. This short survey should only take three minutes to complete and then you can get back to what’s important, honing the art of creating beautiful smiles and building patient confidence.

Participate Anytime 
It’s no secret we are all programmed differently when it comes to productivity. Some are early birds while others are night owls, some love schedules and others fly by the seat of their pants – whatever the case may be, the Resident Survey can be taken at your convenience. Take it online while drinking your morning Caramel Macchiato, waiting on your DoorDash lunch delivery, or after binging your favorite show on Netflix after midnight.

Be Part of a Legacy 
During the last eight years, the Annual Orthodontic Resident Survey has received more than 3,025 responses. This survey provides insight into some of the major issues residents face today, from income expectations to student debt loads. Doctors nearing retirement age commonly ask us about residents and their anticipated plans. The data collected in this survey, along with other industry publications, help create a well-rounded picture of the industry to share with all orthodontists. Being able to compare and contrast this information with the previous years of gathered data from this survey will, hopefully, allow current residents and doctors nearing retirement to gain knowledge and make wise decisions regarding their future.

Responses Remain Confidential 
The answers provided in the Annual Orthodontic Resident Survey remain completely confidential. We want your honest feedback when it comes to the amount of student debt you are accruing, your preparedness to operate a practice, and your expectations for first-year annual income.

Be sure to tell us about your future orthodontic career plans by participating in the Annual Orthodontic Resident Survey (if you have not already). So, give us your feedback; we want to know what you think. Help us help you and take the survey now!

What Should Be Accomplished During an On-Site Visit Interview?

What should you accomplish on a site visit interview?By: Shannon Patterson, CPR, CMSR
Partner, Kolbe Certified™ Consultant

When a potential employer and/or partner is interested in you, chances are you will be invited to visit the practice. Whether it is your first opportunity post-residency or you’re moving on from a previous opportunity you need to make the most out of the site visit. You should know a few basics and questions to ask about the practice and community to ensure you find the right opportunity in the right place.

When, What, and Who?
As you share with co-residents you will quickly realize that no two site visits are the same. It will be up to you to do some homework before the visit to ensure you get the most out of it. Understanding the three basic W’s – the when, what, and who will help you prepare for the visit.

When Does a Visit Take Place?
Typically you are invited to visit a practice after initial conversations with a potential employer and confirming you both are interested in moving forward. At this point, you should understand the position and have a genuine interest in the practice and the community in which it is located. I have had candidates visit practices as early as their first year of residency if the practice meets their goal parameters and is located in their geographical area of interest. Most potential employers, especially those offering a path to equity, are looking for a person who can adapt to their practice culture and they are definitely willing to wait on the right candidate.

What Does the Visit Include?
A site visit is designed to showcase a practice and the community and what it has to offer a candidate in a very short amount of time. We highly recommend an overnight stay to maximize the visit. Most of the time the visit is tailored to each candidate but has a standard format which usually includes additional interviewing with the doctor, meeting with the team, clinical shadowing, touring the community, dinner with spouses and possibly a social event in the community. We also recommend meeting with a local realtor if you feel strongly that you will accept the position.

Who Should Join You?
Although it is you the practice is interviewing if you are married your spouse will likely have a very important role during the visit. Orthodontic practices typically are very involved in the communities they serve and want to ensure that you and your family will feel comfortable and welcomed. Spouses are often the number one reason candidates reject a job offer especially if the spouse did not attend the site visit. One of the most important parts of the site visit is to envision yourself and your family living in the community where the practice is located. The second part of the “who” question I often hear is “who” pays for the site visit? A potential employer should pay for you to visit the practice. That usually includes airfare, hotel, and a rental car. It is customary that the potential employer reimburse you for travel expenses after the site visit is complete but some employers offer to make travel arrangements for you; either is fine just be sure to get a plan in writing so you understand what will be covered.

Remember your goal on a site visit is to gather as much information as possible about the clinical position, the practice culture, and its alignment with your own values, and the surrounding area and whether it will meet your social needs. At the end of a site visit, you should confirm that the opportunity has the right culture, the right team, and is located in the right place for you to start a successful orthodontic career.

Personal Takeaways from GORP 2019

Bentson_Copple_Associates_GORP_2019By: Mandy King
Client Support Associate

I had the opportunity to attend my first GORP (Graduate Orthodontic Residents Program) this year in St. Louis along with Shannon Patterson and Anthony Copple. Here are a few things I took away from time spent with our industry’s current orthodontic residents and other vendors.

Orthodontic residents are rock stars! They have a drive for success and a passion for their future. As they took time out of their schedules to stop at our booth, I was able to chat with several of them about their plans and where they see themselves after residency. Many have narrowed down a general location, some are open to going anywhere, and several want to find the opportunity that is the perfect fit. I think the one common denominator was that they are all so excited about the career path they have chosen and look forward to sharing that joy with their future patients.

GORP is a great time for residents to come together and celebrate their journey and where they are headed in their professional careers. They are all working hard to achieve the same goal, so for residents from all over the country to be in one location is incredible. Being able to sit back and observe them meeting one another, talking about residency, and simply having fun together was priceless. Several of the residents expressed to me that GORP is an event that they feel like every resident should attend. They are able to take a step back to breathe and relax for a few days, while still being immersed in learning about the path they have chosen.

I think I can speak for the majority of the vendors at the event when I say we were all there for one purpose – to get to know the next generation of orthodontists and to share our knowledge about the industry or products with them. There is just something about being able to meet people face-to-face that allows you to connect with them and understand who they are as individuals.

While GORP might be known as one big party, it is so much more than that for residents. It is a time for being refreshed. It is a time for learning about the industry and what they can expect once they begin their careers. It is a time that we as vendors can take to hang out with the residents we work closely with to form relationships that will better help us serve them.

Thank you all for a great first time at GORP and I look forward to seeing you all again in the future!

As an Orthodontic Resident, When Should I Begin Searching for a Practice Opportunity?

As an orthodontic resident, when should I begin searching for a practice opportunity?By: Mandy King
Client Support Associate

As a liaison for residents seeking orthodontic opportunities, my job is to provide you with support during the recruitment process with our placement services. In doing so, I am able to share insight about crafting an “About Me” letter, preparing a curriculum vitae, and answer any questions you might have, including ‘when should I start looking for an opportunity?’

You should begin to determine in which state and city or town you wish to practice after the first six months of your residency. If you wait until your last year to start the process of identifying the area in which you wish to live, you are taking a gamble on finding an opportunity. Some of you are pretty open to different areas, which is great because this will give you more opportunities. A good rule of thumb is, beginning when you are one year out from graduation, you should dedicate two hours per week to your job search depending on your geographical preferences.

If you are considering buying-in or purchasing a practice, you need to start preparing early. Be on the lookout a year or two in advance for practices for sale in the areas where you hope to purchase. Speak with a lender to determine financial goals you may need to meet in order to be extended a loan.

Do not hesitate to inquire about opportunities that interest you or to ask questions you may have about current market trends. You never know when the “right” one will present itself.

Each month our team sends out the Bentson Copple InSight e-newsletter which includes a list of available practice opportunities. If you are not receiving the InSight and would like to stay up-to-date with current orthodontic career opportunities, please click here and sign up.

Join Us at the 2019 AAO Annual Session

AAO 2019 Resident & Young Doctor

The Bentson Copple & Associates’ team will be attending the upcoming AAO Annual Session (May 3-7) in Los Angeles, CA and involved in many resident and younger doctor events. The Annual Session offers many educational lectures, career networking, and other opportunities. Listed below are a few events our team will be participating in.

2019 Practice Transition Seminar
Friday, May 3 – 8:00am – 5:00pm
Information & Tickets
The highly-anticipated all-day Practice Transition Seminar is a tool to aid orthodontists during the challenging time of a career transition. The seminar brings together experts to share insights for orthodontists that are preparing for a future transition. Shannon Patterson and Chris Bentson will be speaking on arrangement options for associates, partners, and group practices. In addition, they will be participating in an interactive panel discussion focused on career opportunities and emerging practice trends. The event will end with a networking reception.

Practice Trends & Profit Model Lecture
Saturday, May 4 – 1:00pm – 2:00pm
There is so much changing in dentistry and the specialty of orthodontics. In this lecture, Chris Bentson will discuss the new orthodontic profit model, consumer demographics, and explore today’s rapidly changing market trends effecting orthodontic practices. This 1-hour, AAO Annual Session-sponsored lecture will be held in Room #502 – Level 2.

Orthodontic Career Fair
Sunday, May 5 – 2:00pm – 4:30pm
Information & Directions
Our team will be a part of the annual Orthodontic Career Fair, held at JW Marriott Los Angeles Diamond Ballroom. The event offers the opportunity to engage face-to-face with employer representatives and discuss possible opportunities. The event will feature many companies and practices with available opportunities, such as associate positions, equity-minded associate opportunities, and practices for sale. This is a free event and is open to all to attend.

Exhibit Floor
We invite all doctors to stop by the Bentson Copple & Associates Booth (#947) any time during the Annual Session. Our team will be happy to discuss plans for a potential practice valuation/appraisal, a practice transition or any other change of orthodontic ownership. Residents and job seekers can also learn more about our placement services and variable career opportunities.

2019 Orthodontic Resident-Only Bracket Challenge Winner

BC&A Basketball MadnessThe games are over and the Virginia Cavaliers have been crowned the 2019 NCAA Champions – a first for the team. Sadly, no one was able to fill out a perfect bracket, thanks to the usual upsets and surprises on the court.

Congratulations to Dr. Brad Herman from University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Dentistry’s Orthodontics Program, who had the highest score in our Orthodontic Resident-Only Bracket Challenge! While not a perfect bracket, Brad did pick Virginia to go all the way. Unfortunately, he went with Gonzaga as their championship opponent. For completing the winning bracket, Dr. Herman takes home a $250 Amazon.com gift card and complimentary Buyer Representation/Valuation Review Services (a $6,250 value)!

Our runner-up, who was only four points behind the winner, was Dr. Daniel Camacho from Seton Hill University. Dr. Camacho also won a $250 Amazon.com gift card.

Thanks to everyone who participated. And remember, it’s never too early to start thinking about next year’s bracket!

Why is Team Building Important for an Orthodontic Office?

By: Mandy King
For sixteen years, I had the privilege to work in a successful orthodontic practice. Our orthodontist always said that the reason for our success was due to teamwork, the way we interacted with the patients, and the efficient service we provided. He never boasted about the fact that he was well-known in our community as being the best around. You might be wondering what made us a good team?

Team Building
A team building event once a quarter is a great goal to strive towards. My favorite team building outing was cooking for parents and siblings at the Ronald McDonald House. This allowed us to work as a team to provide a meal for families in our area who had a child in the hospital. My friend and co-worker was a recipient of this program, so this was very special for us to be able to give back. An exciting outing we once went on was a high ropes course. This challenged us to help one another to complete the courses laid out before us. Whatever avenue you choose for a team building exercise, have fun and enjoy being out of the office for a change.

Working Together
We knew how to work together because we made it a point to support each other. There was no division between the “front and back.” The scheduling coordinators would do everything possible to make sure that the clinic could function efficiently and in turn, the clinical assistants communicated all day to ensure that everyone was staying on task and taking care of the patients. Our office averaged a hundred patients a day, so it was very important for us to be able to communicate and work together.

Loving One Another
Our team would go on a weekend retreat that we looked forward to every year. This retreat allowed us to focus on just spending quality time together and forming relationships out of the office. We were truly a “family.” When you love the people you work with, it makes doing your job a lot easier. Patients can sense whether the team gets along or not when they come into your office. That makes forming the bonds with one another all the more important. Although I am no longer a part of this team, the friendships I made during my time in that position have remained.


This article was featured in the October 2018 edition of The InSight, our monthly email published for orthodontic residents and doctors seeking practice opportunities. This monthly email provides news and information focused on the fast-changing orthodontic industry and its relation to current and future orthodontic careers, highlight commonly asked questions that are timely to the young orthodontic community, and provide a current list of available practice opportunities. Click here to sign up for the email. 

How Do You Determine Your Career Path After Orthodontic Residency?

By: Mandy King
You have taken that step in identifying a career that appeals to you, but deciding your next step may still be the missing piece of your puzzle. There are many factors you need to examine and decisions you need to make as you approach your final year. You should be asking yourself a few questions:

Where Do I Want to Live?
This is extremely important for those who have a family. Being in agreement about where you would like to practice is a decision that should be made with your spouse. Does the community culture align with your beliefs and values? Ask yourself if the area meets your interests and financial needs. Making sure you and your family will be “happy” is a key factor when deciding where you want to practice.

What Are My Short-Term and Long-Term Goals?
Making a career plan takes time and effort on your part. Commit to establishing your expectations and objectives as you seek an opportunity. Remember who you are and why you chose this career.

Do I Want to Practice as an Associate in a Private Practice?
Ask yourself if you desire mentorship from a senior doctor. Do you see yourself working with this potential employer? Do your personalities “mesh”? Make it a point to visit the practice and see if the culture is a good fit for you. Observe the interaction between the staff and the patients. Can you see yourself practicing in that environment?

Am I Willing to Work for a DSO?
If you are wanting to focus solely on orthodontics, corporate may be a better choice. In some cases, you can negotiate a schedule and salary that are guaranteed regardless of the organization’s ups and downs. As with a private practice, just be sure to find the right fit.

Would I Like an Equity-Minded Associateship Opportunity?
This is an opportunity to consider for an orthodontist that desires to own their own practice in the somewhat near future. You are able to come in as an associate and “get your feet wet” by getting to know the patients and learning about the ins and outs of the practice you would one day be a partner in. Understand that non-competes in most states will be required and are enforceable.

Should I Purchase a Practice?
Financially speaking, is this possible for you? This path does allow you the ability to control your own schedule and usually maximize income. However, the freedoms of having your own practice come with a price. As a small business owner, you have many responsibilities that come along with that title and there are many resources available for you to get help in these areas.

This is an important decision that simply comes down to making sure you stay true to yourself by seeking the best opportunity for you and your family. Know who you are, choose a location, identify the right practice, and begin your journey in confidence.


This article was featured in the September 2018 edition of The InSight, our monthly email published for orthodontic residents and doctors seeking practice opportunities. This monthly email provides news and information focused on the fast-changing orthodontic industry and its relation to current and future orthodontic careers, highlight commonly asked questions that are timely to the young orthodontic community, and provide a current list of available practice opportunities. Click here to sign up for the email. 

New U.S. Census Data and Trends to Watch

By: Shannon Patterson
The population changes every year in the United States. Generally we see a positive change with the overall populations meaning more births and deaths, however, a few states had more deaths than births according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

According to the Bureau’s factors that contribute to the 2016-2017 estimates for populations for the 50 states results are international and domestic migration and the “natural population change,” which is the net births minus deaths.

The results showed that two states, Maine and West Virginia, actually saw more deaths than births. Maine’s natural population went down by 0.9 residents per 1,000, while West Virginia’s dropped by 1.7 residents per 1,000. However, Utah had an excess of births over deaths contributing to why it’s ranked the third fastest growing state with natural increase.

Idaho was the nation’s fastest-growing state over the last year. Its population increased 2.2 percent to 1.7 million from July 1, 2016, to July 1, 2017. The next largest percentage increases in state population were; Nevada (2.0 percent), Utah (1.9 percent), Washington (1.7 percent), and Florida along with Arizona (1.6 percent).

The two fastest growing states Idaho and Nevada experienced “domestic migration,” which is defined by the number of residents who move into a state from another, minus the people who moved out of that state. The census showed that the Northeastern and Midwestern states tended to lose population due to domestic migration as more residents moved out of the state than into the state. By region, the Western and Southern states mostly saw gains from other parts of the country. States that saw dramatic increases due to domestic migration were Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, Arizona, and Montana.

Overall, the southern and western regions led America’s population growth. In 2017, 38 percent of the nation’s population was in the Southern states and 23.8 percent in the Western states.

A number of common factors affect migration patterns throughout the country. Residents move from state to state for economic and educational opportunities as well as quality of life factors and the cost of living. Many of the fastest growing states have midsize cities with quality school systems, low unemployment rates, and offer affordable housing.

To determine the fastest growing and shrinking states, the WSJ reviewed the one-year population change of all 50 states from 2015 to 2016 with data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Below is a list of the fastest growing and shrinking states in the U.S.

Fastest Growing
Idaho
The population of Idaho increased by 1.8% in 2016. Idaho has a relatively high birth rate, and natural growth accounting for about one-third of all new Idahoans in 2016. The remaining population growth was due to the large influx of residents from other parts of the country. A net total of 17,143 Americans relocated to Idaho in 2016, far more than in most states.

Utah
The population of Utah grew by 2.0% in 2016, nearly three times the 0.7% national population growth rate and the fastest pace of any state. Unlike most fast-growing states, the majority of Utah’s population increase was due to natural growth. Utah has the largest average family size in the country. While Utah’s high birth-to-death ratio accounted for most of the state’s population growth, Utah’s population also grew more from inbound migration than many other states.

Nevada
The population of Nevada increased by 2.0% in 2016, The state has sustained strong population growth over the past decade, growing by 16.5% from 2006 to 2016, nearly twice the 8.3% national growth rate.

Florida
Like many of the fastest-growing states, Florida’s rapid population growth was largely due to migration. About 9 in every 10 new Floridians either moved from another state or from another country.

Washington
Washington state’s population grew by 1.8% in 2016, more than twice the 0.7% national population growth rate. The state’s strong population growth over the past decade was accompanied by a large increase in their GDP. The states information sector such as industry giants including Microsoft, Amazon, and Expedia ignited the growth.

Oregon
Since 2006, Oregon’s population has grown at an average rate of 1.1%. Approximately 3 in every 4 new Oregonians in 2016 moved to the state from another state (domestic migration), with the remaining population increase due to natural growth. Many new residents likely came to Oregon for economic opportunity.

Colorado
Colorado’s population grew by 1.7% in 2016, among the fastest pace of any state. Like many of the fastest growing states, domestic migration contributed the most to the states rapid population growth. A net influx of 50,216 Americans relocated to Colorado in 2016.

Arizona
Arizona’s population grew by 1.7% in 2016, more than twice the 0.7% national population growth rate. Most of the state’s growth was again due to new residents migrating from another state. A net total of 61,544 Americans relocated to Arizona that year in 2016.

Fastest Shrinking States
West Virginia
West Virginia was one of two states to see both negative natural growth and net migration loss in 2016. West Virginia, which has one of the oldest populations of any state, has the highest death rate and one of the lowest birth rates in the country. Approximately 2,700 more West Virginians died than were born in 2016, accounting for one-fourth of the state’s total population loss. Most of the population loss was due to people leaving the state. Major factors causing people to migrate out of West Virginia were the high unemployment rates and poverty. In total, West Virginia’s population decreased by about 10,000 residents in 2016, the most of any state relative to population size.

Illinois
While the population of Illinois has increased nearly every year in the past five decades, the state’s population declined in 2014, 2015 and 2016. The state’s population shrank by 0.3% in 2016, the second fastest pace of decline of any state. A large share of the population loss was due to residents leaving the Chicago-Naperville-Elgin metro area. In a survey conducted by the Chicago Tribune, residents who had moved out of the city in recent years cited high taxes, unemployment, poor weather, and violent crime as primary reasons for leaving Chicago. The population decreased by over 37,508 residents with the majority of them being from the city of Chicago (19,570).

Vermont
The population of Vermont declined by 0.2% in 2016, the third largest contraction of any state. Most of the population decline was largely due to outbound migration. Approximately 2,000 more residents moved out of Vermont in 2016 than moved in, nearly the largest loss of any state when adjusted for population size. Vermont’s population growth was also impacted by the state’s low birth rate.

Connecticut
The state’s population shrank by 0.2% in 2016, the fourth largest decline in the nation. Connecticut’s population has declined substantially in recent years, with approximately 20,000 residents exciting since 2013. Unfortunately, many of the residents leaving the state are young, college-educated professionals. The population loss will likely hurt the state’s economic potential.

Wyoming
Wyoming was the only state to grow more from natural growth than the United States as a whole in 2016 and still have population loss overall. Approximately 2,800 more new Wyomingites were born than died in 2016, however, heavy outbound migration led to negative population growth in Wyoming overall. Overall 3,823 more residents moved out of Wyoming in 2016 than moved in, more than in any other state relative to population size.

Pennsylvania
While the U.S. population grew by 0.7% in 2016, the population of Pennsylvania shrank by 0.1%. The change was largely due to residents who moved out of the state; approximately 45,600 more residents exited the state than moved in making it one the largest domestic outflow states in the nation. Pennsylvania’s population loss was also partially due to the state’s low birth-to-death ratio. Overall, Pennsylvania grew less from natural growth than any state other than New Hampshire, Maine, and West Virginia.

Mississippi
The population of Mississippi declined by approximately 660 residents in 2016. The population loss was largely due to outbound migration to other states. Roughly 7,500 more Mississippi residents moved out of the state than moved in during 2016. While Mississippi had positive natural growth in 2016, the state’s death rate was relatively high, and the natural population growth was lower than the national average. Many residents exited the state due to the state’s low quality of life, and depressed economy. Today, over 20% of state residents live in poverty, the largest share in the country.

New York
New York is one of many Northeastern states whose populations are rapidly declining due to outbound migration. While the state gained a net total of 118,478 new residents from other countries, over 190,000 residents moved out of New York to another state in 2016 than moved in.


This article was featured in the August 2018 edition of The InSight, our monthly email published for orthodontic residents and doctors seeking practice opportunities. This monthly email provides news and information focused on the fast-changing orthodontic industry and its relation to current and future orthodontic careers, highlight commonly asked questions that are timely to the young orthodontic community, and provide a current list of available practice opportunities. Click here to sign up for the email. 

GORP 2018: Get Your Motor Running

GORP 2018: Get Your Motor RunningPut the pedal to the metal and kick-start your orthodontic career by attending GORP (August 2-5). This year, GORP celebrates 30 years of outstanding learning and networking for orthodontic residents. As doctors embark on the University of Michigan, the excitement intensifies, as there are a variety of lectures scheduled, exhibitors to meet, and many extracurricular activities to attend (including a banquet at the Henry Ford Museum).

If you are attending GORP, be sure to stop by our table and enter to win a Resident Survival Kit! It’s packed full of items that will help you reach the finish line of your residency and put your future orthodontic career in overdrive.

Be sure to take a moment to meet Shannon Patterson and Anthony Copple. They will be happy to answer any questions you may have regarding practice opportunities, placement services, buyer representation services and current market trends. If you are unsure about the direction of your future orthodontic career, Shannon, our Orthodontic Placement Specialist, can provide guidance with your career choices and discuss current market trends in the orthodontic industry. She will have a list of our current practice opportunities, including associate positions, equity-minded associate positions and practices for sale throughout the United States. If you have identified a practice purchase opportunity or an opportunity to join an existing practice as a partner, Anthony will be available to address questions you may have regarding buyer representation.

Our bags are packed and we are hitting the road…hope to see you there!