New Bentson Clark & Copple Website Launched


We are excited to announce the launch of our new and improved website, www.bentsonclark.com.

The new mobile-friendly website features a modern design and an easy-to-navigate interface. Created with the user experience firmly in mind, the website has been developed using responsive design so it is compatible with today’s browsers and mobile devices to deliver a better cross-device experience.

“Bentson Clark & Copple is continuously looking for ways to deliver the best experience to our current and potential clients,” said Chris Bentson, Partner of Bentson Clark & Copple. “The website was created to allow easy access for visitors to obtain the information they need when considering the future of one’s orthodontic practice, across any device.”

Over the past few years, the Bentson Clark & Copple team has experienced growth in the Recruiting/Placement Services portion of their business. The new website provides orthodontic clients and candidates valuable resources and information regarding recruiting and placement of orthodontists who are seeking associateships, equity-minded associateships and permanent placement services.

The website also includes the following:

  • Searchable Career Opportunities – Orthodontic residents and doctors seeking career opportunities can search available practice opportunities by geographic location, type and status.
  • Helpful Resources – Browse an array of articles and consultant links for orthodontists of all career stages.
  • Bentson Clark reSource Information – Subscribe or renew one’s subscription, learn what readers and contributors are saying about the publication and read samples of past editions.
  • Blog Posts – Peruse posts offering practical, useful advice and knowledge addressing a variety of topics.

To access our new online experience, simply visit www.bentsonclark.com from your desktop or mobile device. Let us know what you think!

Bentson Copple Article Featured in Orthodontic Products Magazine

Nearly every younger orthodontist the Bentson Clark & Copple team speaks with wants to eventually own or co-own a practice. As such, we often get asked the question, Is it better to start my own practice from scratch or purchase an existing practice? Doug Copple of Bentson Clark & Copple advises in weighing the financial rewards of both practice situations.

In the latest issue of Orthodontic Products Magazine, Copple explains how to determine which is the best option based on one’s personal situation and examines some of the primary advantages and disadvantages of both starting a new practice and buying an existing one.

Advantages to starting a new practice:
Advantages include the ability for the doctor to create his/her own office and establish everything exactly the way the doctor wants (rather than inheriting the selling doctor’s facility, employees, and systems).

Disadvantages to starting a new practice:
One disadvantage discussed in this article is the fact that orthodontists generally still have to go into debt to purchase equipment and build out the office space. Additional loans are likely to be required to hire and pay employees and to cover operating expenses during the first several months or years until enough income is generated to cover these costs.

Advantages of buying into an existing practice:
One of the largest advantages the purchasing doctor has is an immediate cash flow. If the purchase price is fair, the financial rewards are greater than starting a new practice, even after repaying the purchase obligation. Additionally, the purchaser immediately has a facility and operating equipment (assuming it is in decent operating shape).

Disadvantages of buying into an existing practice:
Disadvantages are similar to the advantages for starting a new practice – ie, the buyer inherits the selling doctor’s facility, employees, and systems. If these assets are not satisfactory to the buying doctor, it can be difficult and time-consuming to make significant changes to the practice.

Financial Reward
The financial reward of acquiring an existing practice is usually much greater than starting a new practice from scratch, particularly in the first few years of ownership. But, undoubtedly, there are many other factors to consider that may make a start-up more attractive than purchasing an existing practice. Within the article, Copple provides example cash flows for both a start-up and the purchase of an existing practice. These examples compare the two opportunities to provide an illustration of the financial rewards of both investments during the initial years of an orthodontist’s career.

Click here to read the entire article.

Reasons an Orthodontic Practice Cannot Grow

As valuation and transition consultants, we have the duty to analyze a practice for sale or purchase with great scrutiny. When performing a practice valuation study, we analyze the last three years of a practice’s financial performance and operational performance for each practice. This provides us not only the revenue and expenses, but the patient flow, the conversion ratios from new patient exams to starts, the fee structure, the marketing plan, etc. More importantly, when visiting each practice, we observe the physical facility, fixed assets in service, staff, location within the practice’s drawing area, competitors’ location(s), and so on. We also perform a detailed demographic analysis of the patient drawing area. Needless to say, we end up with a great deal of data on each practice; having the opportunity to see practices in every geographic region of the country.

Taken together, we see practices that are declining at various rates, practices that are maintaining a relatively flat “status quo” with regards to growth, and practices that are growing at various rates. We see these practices in all areas of the country, in all environments, generally battling a similar competitive and economic environment. However, there are situations that cause a practice not to grow.

There are many contributing reasons as to why a practice cannot grow: competitive environment, demographic environment, geographic limitations, and so on; however, our observation of the number one reason practices cannot grow is because they do not currently operate with efficient systems. Systems are perhaps the key foundation to growth and without them, a practice in chaos will experience greater chaos as it makes decisions and tries to grow, ultimately imploding under the weight of poor systems. Some examples are:

• If patients are not seated on time, adding growth to a practice will only exacerbate the problem.

• If cases are not finishing on time, growth presents real problems as chairs fill up with unhappy zero contract balance patients.

• If the highest level of customer service cannot be currently offered, then providing the same average, predictable, run-of-the-mill, mediocre service inhibits growth.

• If the staff is turning over at an accelerated rate, and there is gossip, backstabbing, and an ununified team that is just getting by, growth is not in a practice’s future.

• If there is poor direction and leadership from the owner, counting on the staff to pick up the leadership role and grow the practice is likely not going to occur.

To learn more, read Chris Bentson’s article, Observations on Growing an Orthodontic Practice, published in Orthodontic Practice US January/February 2013 issue.

Publication Focuses on Adding an Orthodontic Associate

There are many magazines, journals and newspapers that our team reads on a regular basis to keep up with current news and events in the orthodontic community. When a publication arrives, it gets passed around the office with a sticky note, indicating who has read it and who has not. (It’s ultimately a pretty good system unless the sticky note falls off.)

Chris Bentson has been recently published in a couple of orthodontic publications. His most current article is co-authored with Daniel Sroka, JD, who has served the legal needs of Bentson Clark & Copple’s referred clients since 2004. The April/May 2013 issue of Orthodontic Products Magazine features Plus One: What You Need to Know when Adding an Associate to your Practice.  Below is a short excerpt from the article.

“Adding a doctor to the practice is a big decision and affects a great number of systems in the office. Change will occur. Thus, having clarity about why you want an associate is often the first question to ask. While there may be many motivations for bringing an associate into a practice, typically, an owner doctor chooses to bring an associate for one of three reasons.

The first is to help with the workload of treating patients due to practice growth. The second is to allow for more time out of the clinic or away from the practice, or, said another way, to increase the quality of life for the owner doctor within the practice but not necessarily to grow the practice. The third reason is often as a first step in a future transition plan where partial or full equity will eventually be offered to the associate doctor, but that plan is not yet defined.”

Click here read the entire Orthodontic Products article.