Why is Team Building Important for an Orthodontic Office?

By: Mandy King
For sixteen years, I had the privilege to work in a successful orthodontic practice. Our orthodontist always said that the reason for our success was due to teamwork, the way we interacted with the patients, and the efficient service we provided. He never boasted about the fact that he was well-known in our community as being the best around. You might be wondering what made us a good team?

Team Building
A team building event once a quarter is a great goal to strive towards. My favorite team building outing was cooking for parents and siblings at the Ronald McDonald House. This allowed us to work as a team to provide a meal for families in our area who had a child in the hospital. My friend and co-worker was a recipient of this program, so this was very special for us to be able to give back. An exciting outing we once went on was a high ropes course. This challenged us to help one another to complete the courses laid out before us. Whatever avenue you choose for a team building exercise, have fun and enjoy being out of the office for a change.

Working Together
We knew how to work together because we made it a point to support each other. There was no division between the “front and back.” The scheduling coordinators would do everything possible to make sure that the clinic could function efficiently and in turn, the clinical assistants communicated all day to ensure that everyone was staying on task and taking care of the patients. Our office averaged a hundred patients a day, so it was very important for us to be able to communicate and work together.

Loving One Another
Our team would go on a weekend retreat that we looked forward to every year. This retreat allowed us to focus on just spending quality time together and forming relationships out of the office. We were truly a “family.” When you love the people you work with, it makes doing your job a lot easier. Patients can sense whether the team gets along or not when they come into your office. That makes forming the bonds with one another all the more important. Although I am no longer a part of this team, the friendships I made during my time in that position have remained.


This article was featured in the October 2018 edition of The InSight, our monthly email published for orthodontic residents and doctors seeking practice opportunities. This monthly email provides news and information focused on the fast-changing orthodontic industry and its relation to current and future orthodontic careers, highlight commonly asked questions that are timely to the young orthodontic community, and provide a current list of available practice opportunities. Click here to sign up for the email. 

How Do You Determine Your Career Path After Orthodontic Residency?

By: Mandy King
You have taken that step in identifying a career that appeals to you, but deciding your next step may still be the missing piece of your puzzle. There are many factors you need to examine and decisions you need to make as you approach your final year. You should be asking yourself a few questions:

Where Do I Want to Live?
This is extremely important for those who have a family. Being in agreement about where you would like to practice is a decision that should be made with your spouse. Does the community culture align with your beliefs and values? Ask yourself if the area meets your interests and financial needs. Making sure you and your family will be “happy” is a key factor when deciding where you want to practice.

What Are My Short-Term and Long-Term Goals?
Making a career plan takes time and effort on your part. Commit to establishing your expectations and objectives as you seek an opportunity. Remember who you are and why you chose this career.

Do I Want to Practice as an Associate in a Private Practice?
Ask yourself if you desire mentorship from a senior doctor. Do you see yourself working with this potential employer? Do your personalities “mesh”? Make it a point to visit the practice and see if the culture is a good fit for you. Observe the interaction between the staff and the patients. Can you see yourself practicing in that environment?

Am I Willing to Work for a DSO?
If you are wanting to focus solely on orthodontics, corporate may be a better choice. In some cases, you can negotiate a schedule and salary that are guaranteed regardless of the organization’s ups and downs. As with a private practice, just be sure to find the right fit.

Would I Like an Equity-Minded Associateship Opportunity?
This is an opportunity to consider for an orthodontist that desires to own their own practice in the somewhat near future. You are able to come in as an associate and “get your feet wet” by getting to know the patients and learning about the ins and outs of the practice you would one day be a partner in. Understand that non-competes in most states will be required and are enforceable.

Should I Purchase a Practice?
Financially speaking, is this possible for you? This path does allow you the ability to control your own schedule and usually maximize income. However, the freedoms of having your own practice come with a price. As a small business owner, you have many responsibilities that come along with that title and there are many resources available for you to get help in these areas.

This is an important decision that simply comes down to making sure you stay true to yourself by seeking the best opportunity for you and your family. Know who you are, choose a location, identify the right practice, and begin your journey in confidence.


This article was featured in the September 2018 edition of The InSight, our monthly email published for orthodontic residents and doctors seeking practice opportunities. This monthly email provides news and information focused on the fast-changing orthodontic industry and its relation to current and future orthodontic careers, highlight commonly asked questions that are timely to the young orthodontic community, and provide a current list of available practice opportunities. Click here to sign up for the email. 

New U.S. Census Data and Trends to Watch

By: Shannon Patterson
The population changes every year in the United States. Generally we see a positive change with the overall populations meaning more births and deaths, however, a few states had more deaths than births according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

According to the Bureau’s factors that contribute to the 2016-2017 estimates for populations for the 50 states results are international and domestic migration and the “natural population change,” which is the net births minus deaths.

The results showed that two states, Maine and West Virginia, actually saw more deaths than births. Maine’s natural population went down by 0.9 residents per 1,000, while West Virginia’s dropped by 1.7 residents per 1,000. However, Utah had an excess of births over deaths contributing to why it’s ranked the third fastest growing state with natural increase.

Idaho was the nation’s fastest-growing state over the last year. Its population increased 2.2 percent to 1.7 million from July 1, 2016, to July 1, 2017. The next largest percentage increases in state population were; Nevada (2.0 percent), Utah (1.9 percent), Washington (1.7 percent), and Florida along with Arizona (1.6 percent).

The two fastest growing states Idaho and Nevada experienced “domestic migration,” which is defined by the number of residents who move into a state from another, minus the people who moved out of that state. The census showed that the Northeastern and Midwestern states tended to lose population due to domestic migration as more residents moved out of the state than into the state. By region, the Western and Southern states mostly saw gains from other parts of the country. States that saw dramatic increases due to domestic migration were Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, Arizona, and Montana.

Overall, the southern and western regions led America’s population growth. In 2017, 38 percent of the nation’s population was in the Southern states and 23.8 percent in the Western states.

A number of common factors affect migration patterns throughout the country. Residents move from state to state for economic and educational opportunities as well as quality of life factors and the cost of living. Many of the fastest growing states have midsize cities with quality school systems, low unemployment rates, and offer affordable housing.

To determine the fastest growing and shrinking states, the WSJ reviewed the one-year population change of all 50 states from 2015 to 2016 with data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Below is a list of the fastest growing and shrinking states in the U.S.

Fastest Growing
Idaho
The population of Idaho increased by 1.8% in 2016. Idaho has a relatively high birth rate, and natural growth accounting for about one-third of all new Idahoans in 2016. The remaining population growth was due to the large influx of residents from other parts of the country. A net total of 17,143 Americans relocated to Idaho in 2016, far more than in most states.

Utah
The population of Utah grew by 2.0% in 2016, nearly three times the 0.7% national population growth rate and the fastest pace of any state. Unlike most fast-growing states, the majority of Utah’s population increase was due to natural growth. Utah has the largest average family size in the country. While Utah’s high birth-to-death ratio accounted for most of the state’s population growth, Utah’s population also grew more from inbound migration than many other states.

Nevada
The population of Nevada increased by 2.0% in 2016, The state has sustained strong population growth over the past decade, growing by 16.5% from 2006 to 2016, nearly twice the 8.3% national growth rate.

Florida
Like many of the fastest-growing states, Florida’s rapid population growth was largely due to migration. About 9 in every 10 new Floridians either moved from another state or from another country.

Washington
Washington state’s population grew by 1.8% in 2016, more than twice the 0.7% national population growth rate. The state’s strong population growth over the past decade was accompanied by a large increase in their GDP. The states information sector such as industry giants including Microsoft, Amazon, and Expedia ignited the growth.

Oregon
Since 2006, Oregon’s population has grown at an average rate of 1.1%. Approximately 3 in every 4 new Oregonians in 2016 moved to the state from another state (domestic migration), with the remaining population increase due to natural growth. Many new residents likely came to Oregon for economic opportunity.

Colorado
Colorado’s population grew by 1.7% in 2016, among the fastest pace of any state. Like many of the fastest growing states, domestic migration contributed the most to the states rapid population growth. A net influx of 50,216 Americans relocated to Colorado in 2016.

Arizona
Arizona’s population grew by 1.7% in 2016, more than twice the 0.7% national population growth rate. Most of the state’s growth was again due to new residents migrating from another state. A net total of 61,544 Americans relocated to Arizona that year in 2016.

Fastest Shrinking States
West Virginia
West Virginia was one of two states to see both negative natural growth and net migration loss in 2016. West Virginia, which has one of the oldest populations of any state, has the highest death rate and one of the lowest birth rates in the country. Approximately 2,700 more West Virginians died than were born in 2016, accounting for one-fourth of the state’s total population loss. Most of the population loss was due to people leaving the state. Major factors causing people to migrate out of West Virginia were the high unemployment rates and poverty. In total, West Virginia’s population decreased by about 10,000 residents in 2016, the most of any state relative to population size.

Illinois
While the population of Illinois has increased nearly every year in the past five decades, the state’s population declined in 2014, 2015 and 2016. The state’s population shrank by 0.3% in 2016, the second fastest pace of decline of any state. A large share of the population loss was due to residents leaving the Chicago-Naperville-Elgin metro area. In a survey conducted by the Chicago Tribune, residents who had moved out of the city in recent years cited high taxes, unemployment, poor weather, and violent crime as primary reasons for leaving Chicago. The population decreased by over 37,508 residents with the majority of them being from the city of Chicago (19,570).

Vermont
The population of Vermont declined by 0.2% in 2016, the third largest contraction of any state. Most of the population decline was largely due to outbound migration. Approximately 2,000 more residents moved out of Vermont in 2016 than moved in, nearly the largest loss of any state when adjusted for population size. Vermont’s population growth was also impacted by the state’s low birth rate.

Connecticut
The state’s population shrank by 0.2% in 2016, the fourth largest decline in the nation. Connecticut’s population has declined substantially in recent years, with approximately 20,000 residents exciting since 2013. Unfortunately, many of the residents leaving the state are young, college-educated professionals. The population loss will likely hurt the state’s economic potential.

Wyoming
Wyoming was the only state to grow more from natural growth than the United States as a whole in 2016 and still have population loss overall. Approximately 2,800 more new Wyomingites were born than died in 2016, however, heavy outbound migration led to negative population growth in Wyoming overall. Overall 3,823 more residents moved out of Wyoming in 2016 than moved in, more than in any other state relative to population size.

Pennsylvania
While the U.S. population grew by 0.7% in 2016, the population of Pennsylvania shrank by 0.1%. The change was largely due to residents who moved out of the state; approximately 45,600 more residents exited the state than moved in making it one the largest domestic outflow states in the nation. Pennsylvania’s population loss was also partially due to the state’s low birth-to-death ratio. Overall, Pennsylvania grew less from natural growth than any state other than New Hampshire, Maine, and West Virginia.

Mississippi
The population of Mississippi declined by approximately 660 residents in 2016. The population loss was largely due to outbound migration to other states. Roughly 7,500 more Mississippi residents moved out of the state than moved in during 2016. While Mississippi had positive natural growth in 2016, the state’s death rate was relatively high, and the natural population growth was lower than the national average. Many residents exited the state due to the state’s low quality of life, and depressed economy. Today, over 20% of state residents live in poverty, the largest share in the country.

New York
New York is one of many Northeastern states whose populations are rapidly declining due to outbound migration. While the state gained a net total of 118,478 new residents from other countries, over 190,000 residents moved out of New York to another state in 2016 than moved in.


This article was featured in the August 2018 edition of The InSight, our monthly email published for orthodontic residents and doctors seeking practice opportunities. This monthly email provides news and information focused on the fast-changing orthodontic industry and its relation to current and future orthodontic careers, highlight commonly asked questions that are timely to the young orthodontic community, and provide a current list of available practice opportunities. Click here to sign up for the email. 

New Bentson Clark & Copple Website Launched


We are excited to announce the launch of our new and improved website, www.bentsonclark.com.

The new mobile-friendly website features a modern design and an easy-to-navigate interface. Created with the user experience firmly in mind, the website has been developed using responsive design so it is compatible with today’s browsers and mobile devices to deliver a better cross-device experience.

“Bentson Clark & Copple is continuously looking for ways to deliver the best experience to our current and potential clients,” said Chris Bentson, Partner of Bentson Clark & Copple. “The website was created to allow easy access for visitors to obtain the information they need when considering the future of one’s orthodontic practice, across any device.”

Over the past few years, the Bentson Clark & Copple team has experienced growth in the Recruiting/Placement Services portion of their business. The new website provides orthodontic clients and candidates valuable resources and information regarding recruiting and placement of orthodontists who are seeking associateships, equity-minded associateships and permanent placement services.

The website also includes the following:

  • Searchable Career Opportunities – Orthodontic residents and doctors seeking career opportunities can search available practice opportunities by geographic location, type and status.
  • Helpful Resources – Browse an array of articles and consultant links for orthodontists of all career stages.
  • Bentson Clark reSource Information – Subscribe or renew one’s subscription, learn what readers and contributors are saying about the publication and read samples of past editions.
  • Blog Posts – Peruse posts offering practical, useful advice and knowledge addressing a variety of topics.

To access our new online experience, simply visit www.bentsonclark.com from your desktop or mobile device. Let us know what you think!